Back to the Twelve Steps

Howdy out there, friends and a big Happy New Year! I can’t lie, it’s been a tough couple of weeks. Coming down with a cold on Christmas Eve and working itself into some kind of bronchitis, I am just now starting to resurface into the land of the living. Seriously. While the holidays were great, I was sick for much of the winter break. And, I barely made it back to work this week; three days out and a trip to the doctor finally has culminated in what I hope to be a complete recovery from this midwinter cold! I hope all of you fared much better over the course of the holidays.

Did I make any resolutions? Not so much. Except this. Health has to come first this year. No matter what. A friend and I were visiting last week, and she asked me what the hardest part of having this chronic disease is, and I really had to think for a minute. For me, the most difficult thing has been this: I am a workaholic or at least I was. Working hard and giving it my all has always been a brick and mortar component of my identity. Working hard and being independent. Learning how to step back a bit, learning how to balance work and home; learning how to say no, or no, I can’t do it? These have been really difficult challenges.  In recent months, I have had to, just for survival reasons, take a few things off my plate. Framing this is a positive way to myself is the real struggle for me. I am trying to take it all in strides and to learn as much of what I can about myself as I go through this process.

Have I learned anything thus far? I think so? 🙂 I have learned that NO amount of stubborness and hardheadedness (what a word!) will make something happen if I physically and/or emotionally cannot do it! Ha ha! As if this needs to be learned at my age! But apparently, it does. So that is one thing. What else? Yes, that in fact, the world will not end if I cannot do something or take on another responsibility. And, I have also learned that if I do not answer an email ASAP, nothing will actually catch on fire. Again, I laugh at myself for being a bit anal and uptight this long as far as some of these things are concerned. I have also learned how amazing my support system is and how grateful I am to the people who put up with me each and every day.

If I had to make an analogy, and I will although no one is asking, I would say that for me, dealing with a chronic illness is like the road to recovery. Like AA, or Al-Anon in my case. Here’s what I mean. Every single day has to be taken one at a time. I have to be diligent to not fall off the wagon of gratitude and thankfulness into the pit of depression. I have to keep looking for those little daily gems of awesomeness and learn to enjoy them. The first step in Al-Anon is to admit we are powerless over alcohol-that our lives had become unmanageable. Instead, I substitute Lyme Disease for alcohol. So, here it goes, 2015. I admit that I am powerless over Chronic Lyme Dis-ease and that my life has become unmanageable.

Damn. That was hard.

DaliLama

Hope this finds you all well and toasty. Peace – B

Haul Out the Holly

Hi all, so this may not be the only post about the Holidays. Back in the day, I would almost be ready to go for Christmas at this point in the year. But in these past few years, it has become more and more difficult for me to get motivated to do anything related to the holidays. Here at our house, we celebrate Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s.

 

Book xmastree

I’m trying not to dread it, the Holiday Season. Yet, every time I turn around, we are getting closer and closer to that time of year. Thanksgiving wasn’t really that crazy, and honestly, neither are the other holidays really. Our family keeps it pretty low key all the way around, but I am still feeling anxious, I guess. There are just so many expectations involved, and I can barely meet any expectations the rest of the year! I am looking at the holidays as a break from work and time to rest, but that is not what most people have in mind. I know that I should be out visiting family and friends, socializing and having fun but a lot of the time, I am just not up for it. This may sound crazy, but with Lyme, I have experienced sound and light sensitivity along with anxiety. Sometimes, it is a little and sometimes the anxiety is huge. Especially when I am in large groups. There is so much going on and so much stimulus, it just becomes very overwhelming.

But hey, overall, I am just trying to be very thankful for all the love and kindness my family and friends have been showing me throughout this journey and, as for fretting about the holidays?  Thems First World Problems, yo.

Sending the sugar plum fairies your way -B

 

Back to Bed

Well, all in all, this Thanksgiving break, I have had a decent run of it. But Thursday and today, I am paying for it. It’s 12:30 p.m. on a Saturday; my husband and in-laws are outside working on our new shop and here I lay in bed. We did go to our friends’ house last night for dinner. It was lovely, and I had not seen them since Labor Day weekend! When I am at work that is about all I can manage to do so socializing it not something  can partake of much these days. The evening was nice and I kinda felt normal, and not the “new normal”, the old normal.  🙂

In an offensive move, I played everything safe, too! I took my meds as scheduled, I drank just one glass and a smidge of champagne, I ate more salad than anything else, and I shared a piece of cheesecake with my husband. I know that alcohol and sugar are not great for me but, I promise, the rest of the time, I do a pretty good job of not using either. We were home by 10:30 also!  But then, I could not go to sleep.UGH.

I took my doxepin as soon as we arrived at home. I knew it would take a bit to kick in, then I took lunesta. But for the life of me….I think I finally managed to fall out about 1 a.m. I guess this is part of the reason I feel so horrible today? Damn! Waking up about 6 a.m. to give my Chihuahua Chino his anti-seizure meds, I could barely get out of bed. The bodyaches were everywhere; I basically limped to the kitchen. No worries thought I, I will take a pain med and all will be better. Chino got his meds, and I took mine and headed back to bed. I was finally able to get warm and cozy and doze off for a few more hours. At 9, when I did get up for good today, I was in as much pain all over as I was at 6 a.m. Plus, the headache started its familiar knocking. Moving around as much as possible and having my daily cup of joe, I still could not shake the body pain. It’s one of THOSE days, friends. Uncool.

Struggling and stubbornly, I did some household chores and then headed back to my sanctuary, my sweet bed. But, I am still hurting, and I feel frustrated. Chino and our other Chihuahua, Boo Boo, are on the bed with me sacked out, and I am writing this blog.

Where I am today!
Where I am today!

Can anyone suggest anything to help alleviate the bodyaches and pain? Anything? I have tried an Epsom salt bath, and I have taken a pain med. Both have helped a bit, but I a still having difficulty moving around which is a bit scary, honestly. What are some things you do to at least push back these symptoms and/or take the edge off? Thanks in advance.

Peace, B

Accepting or Embracing Chronic Lyme

Howdy, fellows!

Loss for words
My brain on words!

I think I may have mentioned before that I am in the process of accepting, or at least trying to accept, the fact that this disease is going to take a while to shake off. Not only am I struggling to come to terms with that, I am also struggling with the notion that this is a chronic condition (even though the CDC denies this fact).  For me, there is a fine line between acknowledging the illness and embracing it. What I mean is that in my messed up brain, I feel like acknowledging  that I do have chronic Lyme equals giving in. And, I am not a fan of that!

It is ridiculous, I know. Accepting does not equal giving in, but again, in my lymie brain, getting over the semantics of it seems to be a real challenge! Plus, I just read an article about Debbie Gibson in which she states that she doesn’t call her experience with Lyme Disease a battle, she calls it “overcoming” Lyme Disease. See here: http://www.people.com/article/debbie-gibson-lyme-disease-recovery. She says that referring to Lyme Disease as a battle gives it more power. Maybe. Maybe. So, I guess for me, maybe this is a similar conundrum.

Yes, there are bigger and more important fish to fry! But the reality is that I have been dealing with this disease for several years now. I spent about 4 years sick with no idea what was going on, and now I have spent another 21 months in treatment. Sometimes, it is difficult to think about all of this time spent “overcoming” this illness. Although, many people out there have suffered way longer than I have for sure. I just feel like the words I use in my self talk are really important. Do you feel this way? Or am I wasting time on something that really means nothing?

At first, when I started treatment, I did feel that it was a battle. But now, almost 2 years later, I feel battle weary. I was really hoping it would be a short war, and that I would be the victor! I bet we all had hoped this!!   But here I am, years later and still, every day feels like I am fighting. Fighting to get up, to go to work, to make it through the work day…etc. I sure do not feel like I am overcoming anything! Lately, though, I have tried to just accept that indeed, getting up each day for work is a challenge, working all day is a challenge. I am trying to get my brain in sync with my body but without giving in.

Does any of this make any sense to anyone out there? Bottom line is that I know I need to accept this stage I am in more than I do right now so I can hopefully move forward and deal with life as it is right now a little better. But how do I acknowledge or accept where I am right now without feeling or thinking that I am giving in? Can anyone relate to this at all and if so, can you give me any suggestions/advice?

Wishing you all a pain free day. Peace-B